Ask Achievers: What types of recognition work well for a global organization?

September 4, 2013 Achievers

ask_achieversIn this week’s Ask Achievers, Kristen Brancaccio provides helpful tips to create a global culture of recognition. Kristen is a Client Success Associate at Achievers, partnering with best-in-class companies to drive measurable success tailored to their needs.

Dear Achievers,

It’s become increasingly difficult to engage our workforce. We have dozens of offices around the world, with management physically separated from their teams. What are some recognition best practices to positively impact a large, geographically dispersed organization?

That’s a great question and one that I always appreciate talking through with my clients. It’s really important to be mindful of the uniqueness of every location and the individual culture each office has. Make sure there is some flexibility in how they recognize on a smaller scale. Overall, there are three main pillars that have a tremendous amount of influence on the positive adoption of a global culture of recognition.

The first one is executive support. If the executive team initially understands that recognition is a key driver to employee engagement, and sees the impact that engaged employees have on the bottom line, then we are off to a great start. When we leverage that support and make them active participants, promoters, and educators on the program, then we’re really talking! When we see leaders recognizing in a meaningful way, we know that the program is encouraged, and that encourages us to participate.

Similarly, when our leaders use recognition to praise the great efforts on their teams, we can create a consistent employee experience across all offices and give everyone a fair shot at having their great work recognized. To elevate this, identify some of the top leaders and turned them into network-wide program champions. Ask them to not only act as cheerleaders of the program in their region, but also be a great resource if any members or other leaders have questions.

Finally, regardless of what office you work in, or the personal target you’re working towards, we all roll up to the same organizational goals and values. Making company values or specific team metrics the criteria for which someone can be recognized will ensure that the program has a direct impact on the strategic objectives of the organization, and is a great way to align employees to the behaviors that are expected of them day in and day out.

Other small factors will need to be considered as you embark on building out a recognition program for your dispersed population, but with great executive support, leadership accountability, and a program that is aligned the businesses goal, I believe you will be off to a great start! Best of luck!

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